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Find gnu man

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This file documents the GNU utilities for finding files that match certain criteria and performing various operations on them. This file documents the GNU utilities for finding files that match certain criteria and performing various actions on them. This manual shows how to find files that meet criteria you specify, and how to perform various actions on the files that you find. The principal programs that you use to perform these tasks are find , locate , and xargs. Some of the examples in this manual use capabilities specific to the GNU versions of those programs. Many other people have contributed bug fixes, small improvements, and helpful suggestions.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Finding files commands:- find, locate, upadtedb, man

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Getting To Gnow GNU\Linux EP 1- finding files with the find Command

10 Tips for Using GNU Find

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At first glance the options and syntax can seem arcane. Note that not all versions of find are created equal. Much of the syntax is shared and can be used between systems, but not all. Just tell find to search for a specific name:. Assuming that filename exists, find will display the location of the file or files that match that name, like so:. For instance, finding files by size. Which file, or files, do you need to deal with? You can use find to look for files by size and then worry about how to make space.

Not surprisingly, the option to test by size is -size , followed by the size that you want to look for. You can use anything from blocks b to gigabytes G. To find files that are k, you would run:. That would find files that are k in size. You can also find files that are empty using the -empty test:. Note that I included an additional test for the type of file. Another handy use of find is locating files by ownership, or even the lack of ownership. To find those, use:. To find files that are actually owned by a specific user, use the -user or -uid options.

You might want to search for the files that are owned by user A or by user B. You can do this by adding the -o operator:. That will find all files that are owned by root or by www-data. Of course the operators work with other options as well. You could choose to search for all files owned by a user that are not larger than a certain size, for instance:. Another way you can search for files is by group, using the -group option. The basic syntax is just find -group groupname. Naturally, you can combine this with other operators.

The find utility supports this with several different options. The simplest are the -readable , -writable , and -executable operators. These check to see if the file is readable by the user running find. Note that these options are not available in older versions of find, so if your distro is a bit older you may not have those options.

This way you can see if a file matches a specific set of permissions. What if you want to find files that match the executable bit for owner or group?

Any file that matches the group or owner permissions will match the search. Searching by permission can be extremely useful but a little complex.

This is one where reading the man page is not just recommended, but essential. Naturally, find supports this — possibly more than you expect. Not only does find have regular expression support, it handles several different types of regex syntax.

You can set the type using -regextype and one of the supported types like posix-awk , posix-egrep , and so on. See the man page for the supported types. A quick example. I could run the following:. Broken down it says to use the egrep syntax -regextype posix-egrep and then gives the regular expression to search for. Then the. The php js part says to look for php or js.

So if you have a file that is named js. As with permissions, regular expressions can be complicated. We might just cover that topic in a future tutorial. But for now, see the man page for find and its documentation. What if you want to find files by their age? Lots of good reasons, actually. The find utility is all about finding by time. You can search by access time -atime or the last time a file was modified -mtime or by the last time it was changed -ctime.

You can combine the options, if you want to look for files within a specific range. Sometimes you need to look for files modified in the last day or so, and the previous options are a bit too broad for that. The good news is that find also has the -amin , -cmin , and -mmin , which are similar to the other options but they work with minutes rather than days. So if you want to look for something that was changed or accessed in the last day, you can use those options. Sometimes find provides more results than you need, or want.

You can limit find results by using the -maxdepth option. For example, if you wanted to find every JavaScript file in your wordpress directory, you would use this:.

But what if you only want to see if there are any JavaScript files in the top-level directory? You can limit that with -maxdepth :. That will only search the wordpress directory, but not any of the subdirectories. Changing the -maxdepth to 2 would search subdirectories in the wordpress directory, but it would exclude their subdirectories.

Say you want to change the ownership of a bunch of files from root to www-data. Finding all the files is only the first step; you also need to change the ownership. Doing it manually from a list of files returned by find sounds like tedium, and it is. So you might want to use the -exec option to change the ownership:. That command tells find to pass all the files it finds to the chown utility and change the ownership to www-data.

Piece of cake. Knowing the find utility is a must for any Linux user who want to master their systems. You can get by without using find for typical desktop use, but for system administration you need to know your way around find. Please share them in the comments. Sign in. Log into your account. Forgot your password? Password recovery. Recover your password. Get help. Training and Tutorials. Finding Files by User Another handy use of find is locating files by ownership, or even the lack of ownership.

Working with Times What if you want to find files by their age? Limit Searches Sometimes find provides more results than you need, or want.

Summary Knowing the find utility is a must for any Linux user who want to master their systems. How to create a bridge network on Linux with netplan. How to examine processes running on Linux.

How to repeat a Linux command until it succeeds. How to synchronize Ubuntu server directories with Unison. All rights reserved. The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

find (Unix)

This unique and valuable collection of tips, tools, and scripts provides clear, concise, hands-on solutions that can be applied to the challenges facing anyone running a network of Linux servers from small networks to large data centers in the practical and popular problem-solution-discussion O'Reilly cookbook format. The Linux Cookbook covers everything you'd expect: backups, new users, and the like. But it also covers the non-obvious information that is often ignored in other books the time-sinks and headaches that are a real part of an administrator's job, such as: dealing with odd kinds of devices that Linux historically hasn't supported well, building multi-boot systems, and handling things like video and audio. The knowledge needed to install, deploy, and maintain Linux is not easily found, and no Linux distribution gets it just right.

At first glance the options and syntax can seem arcane. Note that not all versions of find are created equal. Much of the syntax is shared and can be used between systems, but not all.

Unix has a reputation for being cryptic and difficult to learn, but it doesn't need to be that way. Think Unix takes an analogous approach to that of a grammar book. Rather than teaching individual words or phrases like most books, Think Unix teaches the set of logical structures to be learned. Myriad examples help you learn individual commands, and practice problems at the end of difficult sections help you learn the practical side of Unix. Strong attention is paid to learning how to read "man pages," the standard documentation on all Unix systems, including Linux.

Finding Files

In Unix-like and some other operating systems , find is a command-line utility that locates files based on some user -specified criteria and then applies some requested action on each matched object. It initiates a search from a desired starting location and then recursively traversing the nodes directories of a hierarchical structure typically a tree. The possible search criteria include a pattern to match against the filename or a time range to match against the modification time or access time of the file. By default, find returns a list of all files below the current working directory , although users can limit the search to any desired maximum number of levels under the starting directory. The related locate programs use a database of indexed files obtained through find updated at regular intervals, typically by cron job to provide a faster method of searching the entire file system for files by name. The two options control how the find command should treat symbolic links. The default behaviour is never to follow symbolic links.

find(1) - Linux man page

Michael Urban is a biology student at the University of Minnesota where he plans to major in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior. He is involved in research projects with African lions and is also the Webmaster for the Lion Research Center. He has worked in numerous IT jobs including Web design and technical analysis. Brian Tiemann has been a constant user of FreeBSD since his student days at Caltech, where he used it to build a movie fan Web site that has continued to grow and sustain more and more load until the present day. Born in Ukiah, California, He has remained in the state all his life; he currently lives in San Jose, works in the networking appliance field, and writes ceaseless commentary about Apple, Microsoft, and the technology field.

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Jun 7, - The GNU find utility is one of the most useful commands you'll ever get This is one where reading the man page is not just recommended, but.

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Comments: 1
  1. Samugar

    What quite good topic

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